Forms and DirectionsDoctor CookePeriodintal DiseaseProceduresContact Us
Gingivitis
Periodontal Disease
Systemic Effects of Periodontal Disease

Periodontal Disease


Gingivitis

Gingivitis is the initial stage and mildest form of periodontal disease. During gingivitis the gums tend to become red, swollen, and may bleed easily. Typically there is no discomfort, however, tenderness and some bleeding of your gums may occur when you brush or floss. Gingivitis is caused by poor oral hygiene and can be reversible with treatment and good oral hygiene. Untreated gingivitis can progress to periodontitis.

Periodontitis

When gingivitis goes untreated bacterial plaque and tartar can spread and grow below the gum line. Once below the gum line it can not be removed by routine brushing and flossing. This creates a chronic infection below the gums that when progresses causes damage to the bone and attachment of the gums to the teeth. With this damage the gums separate from the teeth forming infected pockets. As gum disease progresses the pockets become deeper and more bone and gum tissue is destroyed. When periodontitis goes untreated the teeth will eventually become loose and ultimately be lost.

Systemic effects of Periodontal disease:

Current research shows that periodontal disease may be linked to conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and respiratory disease. Bacteria linked to periodontal disease can travel into the blood stream and affect other parts of the body. Research also shows that pregnant women who have periodontal disease may be seven times more likely to have a premature or low birth weight baby.

For more comprehensive information on periodontal disease go to Perio.org.